Researching Chiropractic: PVCs, GER, & Migraines

There seems to be no limit to the health problems that respond to chiropractic care. How many people suffering, on drugs, facing a life of limitation could be helped by chiropractic care?   Probably most of them.

Premature ventricular contractions (PVCs)

Two women complaining of PVC and other symptoms began chiropractic care. PVCs are extra heartbeats that begin in the heart’s two lower pumping chambers (ventricles) disrupting heart rhythm. It is sometimes felt as a fluttering or a skipped beat.

The first patient was a 26-year-old woman suffering with daily headaches, TMJ, neck pain, midback pain, bilateral wrist pain, shortness of breath with rib pain, irregular heartbeats, lower back pain, hip and knee pain. These complaints had been present for approximately two years.

The other woman was 72-years-old. She was told her PVCs would never stop because they had followed a stroke. Other symptoms included 6 months of pain in the left ring finger that interrupted her sleep. In addition, she also had complaints of knee pain, neck pain, headaches and lower back pain. 

Each woman was assessed for vertebral subluxations using various chiropractic procedures. Vertebral subluxations were found in their cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal regions.

Chiropractic care was individualized for each patient; they were adjusted for their subluxations. No other therapies or modalities were employed. Each showed complete resolution of the PVCs and complete resolution of or great improvement in their other symptoms. (1)

Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) GER

A six-month-old girl was suffering from GER since birth. Milk, soy and bananas worsened her GER while a hypoallergenic formula helped decrease the frequency of the GER attacks. 

She received chiropractic adjustments for her subluxations. Her care plan consisted of two times per week for four weeks and then one time per week for six weeks. She responded to care with complete resolution of her GER and associated symptoms. (2) 

Migraine, neck and lower back pain.migraines

A 23-year-old woman had been suffering from ten years of chronic migraines, neck pain and low back pain. She was given prescription medications (i.e., fluoxetine, Synthroid® and fioricet) that were ineffective. After 10 weeks of continued chiropractic care, she reported that all her presenting complaints of chronic migraines, neck pain and low back pain had completely resolved and all medication was discontinued. (3) 


  1. Hoying M. Resolution of premature ventricular contractions after undergoing chiropractic care: a case series. Annals of Vertebral Subluxation Research. June 24, 2019:83-89.
  2. Egan A, Alcantara J. Resolution of gastroesophageal reflux in an infant following chiropractic care to reduce vertebral subluxation: a case report & review of literature. Journal of Pediatric, Maternal & Family Health, Chiropractic. May 27, 2019:46-54.
  3. Richerson A, Varnum C., Alcantara J. Resolution of chronic migraines & neck pain in a 23-year-old female following chiropractic care for vertebral subluxations: a case study & review of the literature. Annals of Vertebral Subluxation Research. July 1, 2019:90-103.

Tomato Salad with Feta and Pistachios

4 servings

Serve this salad as soon as it is assembled so all of the tomato juices and flavor stay where they belong.

  • Kosher salt
  • freshly ground pepper                              tomatoes-3574426_1280
    ¼ cup Basic Lemon Vinaigrette
  • ¼ cup chopped parsley, plus leaves for serving            
  • ¼ cup crumbled feta
  • 3 Tbs pistachios     
  • 1 pound mixed baby tomatoes-some sliced some diced some whole

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 350°. Toast pistachios on a rimmed baking sheet, tossing once, until golden brown, 6–8 minutes. Let cool, then chop.
  • Arrange tomatoes on a plate; season lightly with salt and pepper. Mix vinaigrette, ¼ cup parsley, and two-thirds of pistachios in a small bowl. Drizzle over tomatoes. Top with feta, parsley leaves, and remaining pistachios.

Basic Lemon Vinaigrette   

Pour into sealable jar and shake well 

  • ⅔ cup olive oil
  • ⅓ cup fresh lemon juice
  • Kosher salt
  • freshly ground pepper

Chiropractic, CTS and TOC: Where is your carpal tunnel?

You won’t find the carpal tunnel on any map-it’s in your wrist. Your carpal (wrist) bones form a tunnel-like structure-the carpal tunnel-through which pass tendons and the median nerve.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is the occupational disease of the 21st century. Sufferers experience tingling and numbness in the hands, fingers and wrists; blanching (whitening upon pressure) of the hand; pain so intense that it awakens you at night and more. (1-2)

carpal tunnel

Who gets CTS?

Years ago, telegraph operators, seamstresses, carpenters and meat cutters were the CTS sufferers. Today office workers, computer operators, musicians and assembly line workers are more prone to it. 

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS)

A similar condition is thoracic outlet syndrome. TOS affects the nerves in the upper back as they exit the neck. The symptoms include pain, weakness and numbness or tingling in the arm. (3) 

The Medical and Chiropractic Approaches

The medical approach to persistent symptoms may include corticosteroid injections or surgery. For over a hundred years, however, Doctors of Chiropractic have been adjusting people’s spines to release stress from their nervous systems. Clinicians, researchers and patients have reported relief of classic carpal tunnel symptoms and improvement in overall body function after chiropractic adjustments. (4-5)


  1. Davis L, Wellman H, Punnett L. Surveillance of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome in Massachusetts, 1992-1997: a report from the Massachusetts sentinel event notification system for occupational risks (SENSOR). Am J Ind Med. 2001;39(1):58-71.
  2. Verghese J, Galanopoulou AS, Herskovitz S. Autonomic dysfunction in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Muscle Nerve. 2000;23(8):1209-1213.
  3. Narakas AO. The role of thoracic outlet syndrome in the double crush syndrome. Annales de Chirurgie de la Main et du Membre Superieur. 1990;9(5):331-340. 
  4. Bonebrake AR et al. A treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome: evaluation of objective and subjective measures. JMPT. 1990;13:507-520.
  5. Davis PT, Hulbert JR, Kassak KM et al. Comparative efficacy of conservative medical and chiropractic treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized clinical trial. JMPT. 1998;21(5):317-326.

Coffee Is Good for You

Up to 25 Cups of Coffee a Day Is Safe for Heart, Says New Study

A British Heart Foundation funded study found that drinking five cups of coffee a day, and even up to 25, was no worse for your arteries than drinking less than one cup a day. Further, coffee won’t increase stroke or heart attack risk. (11) 

Drinking Coffee Could Lead to A Longer Life, Scientist Says

Whether it’s caffeinated or decaffeinated, coffee is associated with lower mortality, which suggests the association is not tied to caffeine. 

Drinking coffee was associated with lower risk of death due to heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, and kidney disease. People who consumed a cup of coffee a day were 12 percent less likely to die compared to those who didn’t drink coffee. This association was even stronger for those who drank two to three cups a day – 18 percent reduced chance of death. 

coffee


Gunter M et al. Coffee drinking and mortality in 10 European countries: a multinational cohort study. Annals of Internal Medicine. 2017;167(4):236-247. doi: 10.7326/M16-2945

Grilled corn and farro salad

Serves 6grilled corn

Ingredients

1 cup uncooked farro ( Find it in the rice aisle at Meijer)

3 ears corn, shucked                               

1/4 cup plus 2 teaspoons olive oil, divided 

1 cup chopped tomatoes                         

1/3 cup chopped pistachios

1/2 cup halved kalamata olives               

1/4 cup chopped basil leaves 

3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice              

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 garlic clove, minced                             

1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika 

Directions

Bring 5 cups of water and a large pinch of salt to a boil. Add the farro and reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until farro is al dente about 15 minutes. Drain and set aside

.While the farro is cooking, heat a grill pan over medium-high heat (or, preheat a grill to medium-high.) Rub the corn kernels with 2 teaspoons of the olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Cook, turning with tongs, until charred, about 10 minutes. Cut off the kernels and add to the farro bowl. 

Add the chopped tomatoes, olives, pistachios and basil to the corn and farro bowl. 

In a separate bowl, whisk together the Dijon mustard, finely minced garlic clove, paprika and lemon juice until garlic is dissolved.. Slowly whisk in the remaining olive oil along with a pinch of salt and pepper. 

Add the dressing to the farro bowl and toss well; season to taste, if needed and serve.

ENJOY YOUR GARDEN PRODUCE/FARMERS MARKET GOODIES…THIS IS THE BEST TIME OF THE YEAR FOR STUFF STRAIGHT OUT OF THE GARDEN/FARM

BACK TO SCHOOL AND BACKPACK SAFETY

Backpacks come in all sizes, colors, fabrics, and shapes and help kids of all ages express their own personal sense of style. And when used properly, they’re incredibly handy.

When worn correctly, the weight in a backpack is evenly distributed across the body, and shoulder and neck injuries are less common than if someone carried a briefcase or purse.

As practical as backpacks are, though, they can strain muscles and joints and may cause back pain if they’re too heavy or are used incorrectly.

backpacks

Problems Backpacks Can Pose

It is recommended that kids carry no more than 10% to 15% of their body weight in their packs. But many carry a lot more than that. When a heavy backpack is incorrectly placed on the shoulders, the weight’s force can pull a child backward. To compensate, the child might bend forward at the hips or arch the back. This can make the spine compress unnaturally, leading to shoulder, neck, and back pain.

Kids who wear their backpacks over just one shoulder — as many do, because they think it looks better or just feels easier — may end up leaning to one side to offset the extra weight. They might develop lower and upper back pain and strain their shoulders and neck.

backbacks

Finding a Safe Backpack

Look for the following to choose the right backpack:

  • a lightweight pack: get one that doesn’t add a lot of weight to your child’s load; for example, leather packs look cool, but they weigh more than canvas backpacks
  • two wide, padded shoulder straps: straps that are too narrow can dig into shoulders
  • a padded back: it not only provides increased comfort, but also protects kids from being poked by sharp objects or edges (pencils, rulers, notebooks, etc.) inside the pack
  • a waist belt: this helps to distribute the weight more evenly across the body
  • multiple compartments: to help distribute the weight throughout the pack

backpacks

Using Backpacks Wisely

To help kids prevent injury when using a backpack:

  • Lighten the load. No matter how well-designed the backpack, less weight is always better. Use the bathroom scale to check that a pack isn’t over 10% to 15% of your child’s body weight (for example, the backpack of a child who weighs 80 pounds shouldn’t weigh more than 8 to 12 pounds).
  • Use and pick up the backpack properly. Make sure kids use both shoulder straps. Also tighten the straps enough for the backpack to fit closely to the body. The pack should rest evenly in the middle of the back and not sag down to the buttocks.

backpacks 3

What Kids Can Do

A lot of the responsibility for packing lightly — and safely — rests with kids:

  • Encourage kids to use their locker or desk often throughout the day instead of carrying the entire day’s worth of books in the backpack.
  • Make sure kids don’t tote unnecessary items — laptops, cellphones, and video games can add extra pounds to a pack.
  • Encourage kids to bring home only the books needed for homework or studying each night.
  • Picking up the backpack the right way can help kids avoid back injuries. As with any heavy weight, they should bend at the knees and grab the pack with both hands when lifting a backpack to the shoulders.
  • Use all of the backpack’s compartments, putting heavier items, such as textbooks, closest to the center of the back.

What You Can Do

Involving other parents and your child’s school in solving students’ backpack burdens might help to lessen kids’ loads. Some ways the school can get involved include:

  • giving students more time between classes to use lockers
  • using paperback books
  • adding school education programs about safe backpack use
  • putting some curriculum on the school’s website, when possible

 

Greetings from Charmaine: July/August 2019

Greetings all,February 2019

I hope those of you who have taken a vacation enjoyed your time away.  It’s always good to let go of day-to-day worries and cares and take time to recharge our batteries.

I find it hard that this country has such apparent “disdain” for the vacation.  In South Africa, we all got 3 weeks’ vacation from day one of working and it is said you need all three….one week to unwind, one to relax and one to slowly get prepared for going back to work. Norway gets 6 weeks a year and is one of the happiest places in the world!

It is not something to brag about “I don’t need a vacation”……YES you do- unless you happen to work only half days and have a phenomenal sense of balance and spend at least an hour or two each day on self-care. That’s why so many executives and “high powered” administrators end up with all these nasty things like cancer and heart attacks…they have not taken time to recharge their batteries and have a life of balance….a lot of these “millennial” startup companies have the right idea about bringing your dog to work, having a gym on the premises, fresh food cafeterias and goof off rooms, etc.

Sages have said that we should spend a little time each day going on vacation. Every day we should do something that we especially love to do, something that’s deeply true to our purpose in life. Whether that’s making music, meditating, praying, exploring, learning, sharing heartfelt time with someone or another healthy diversion, it should be done every day. Why? So our lives will have balance.

Enjoy the summer and remember…. as the kids go back to school and get into sports….chiropractic care will keep them functioning at their best!!!

See you on the table, on the yoga mat, under the barbells or just walking around town!

Researching Chiropractic: ADHD, Meniere’s Disease, Pins-and-needles

Chiropractic clinical case histories have been a regular feature of our patient newsletter since its inception. There seems to be no limit to the health problems that respond to chiropractic care. How many people suffering, on drugs, facing a life of limitation could be helped by chiropractic care?   

Probably most of them.

If you know anyone suffering from any of the following conditions, please share this article with them and encourage them to give us a call. We can help. 517.627.4547

A child with headaches, autism, ADHD and OCD11 boy

An 11-year-old boy diagnosed with autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and headaches affecting his school attendance and sleep was brought in for chiropractic care. 

A chiropractic analysis showed that he had subluxations in his left hip, sacrum, occiput (back of the skull) and neck and mid back vertebral subluxations (C1, C2 and T8).

The boy’s subluxations and structural distortions were addressed. His headache symptoms improved as did his behavioral problems and his quality of life. (1) 

Meniere’s Disease55 man

A 55-year-old man had been diagnosed with Meniere’s disease. He was experiencing constant dizziness, occasional vertigo (sensation of spinning), earache, ear noise and occasional deafness. His symptoms continued to worsen over eight years.

The patient was evaluated using chiropractic methods and found to have a subluxation in his upper neck (C1 vertebral subluxation).

He had his first chiropractic visit and adjustment and had an immediate improvement. After two weeks his condition completely resolved. (2)

Chronic migraines, pins-and-needles and disability35 man

A 35-year old man with a history of sports injuries presented himself at a chiropractic clinic. His complaints included neck pain and stiffness, pins and needles into his left shoulder, low back pain and difficulty sleeping. The patient had a previous history of chronic headaches and migraines.

Over an eight-week period he received 24 chiropractic adjustments for vertebral subluxation correction. In addition to resolution of his pain, the patient-centered outcome assessments revealed improved physical, social and psychological functioning and decreased disability. There were improvements in cervical curve and reduction of anterior head carriage. (4) 

Pubic pain in a pregnant womanpregnant case study

A 28-year-old who was in her 20th week of pregnancy was suffering from symphysis pubic dysfunction. The pubic bones are in front of the pelvis. She was experiencing pain at the pubic bone region and in both inner thighs for the prior three months. 

She had one previous pregnancy and had experienced mild pubic pain, but with this pregnancy the pain was much worse. 

Her spine and structural system were analyzed using chiropractic procedures. Her upper neck vertebra (C1), coccyx (tail bone) and right inferior pubic bone were found to be subluxated. All were corrected using chiropractic techniques and after three visits her pain abated and she had full mobility. She felt fine during the rest of her pregnancy and delivered a healthy baby boy. After birth (postpartum), she reported greater comfort while walking. (5)


  1. Stone LL, Alcantara J. Resolution of chronic headaches, improved sociability, health & physical behavior in a child with autism, ADHD and obsessive compulsive disorder following chiropractic care to reduce vertebral subluxation: a case report & review of literature. Journal of Pediatric, Maternal & Family Health, Chiropractic. June 17, 2019:63-70.
  2. Fraser J. Resolution of symptoms in a patient with Meniere’s disease following upper cervical chiropractic care: a case report. Journal of Upper Cervical Chiropractic Research. May 30, 2019:36-41.
  3. Spriggs M. Resolution of chronic migraines & disability with improved physical, social and psychological functioning following chiropractic care using CBP® protocols: case study & review of the literature. Annals of Vertebral Subluxation Research. May 19, 2019:66-78.
  4. Shtulman I, Miller H, Alcantara J. Resolution of symphysis pubic pain & dysfunction following chiropractic care in a pregnant patient: case study & review of the literature. Journal of Pediatric, Maternal & Family Health, Chiropractic. April 18, 2019:36-40.

BLACK BEAN AND CORN SALAD

 Servings: 8   

Author: Elizabeth Lindemann

black beansFor the Dressing:

For the Salad:

  • 45 oz. canned black beans (3 small cans) drained and rinsed
  • 16 oz. frozen corn (3 cups) thawed and patted dry
  • 2 jalapeño peppers de-seeded and diced
  • 1 bell pepper diced (I used 1/2 red and 1/2 orange for color)
  • 1/2 cup fresh cilantro roughly chopped
  • 1/2 cup red onion diced

Instructions

  1. Whisk together olive oil, honey, lime juice, salt, pepper, and cayenne pepper in a large bowl.
  2. Add remaining ingredients to bowl. Taste and adjust seasonings if necessary.
  3. Mix and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.
  4. Serve cold.

GREEN GODDESS PASTA SALAD

serves 6-8GREEN GODDESS PASTA SALAD

  • 1 lb gemelli cooked according to package instructions, drained
  • 6.35 ounce  Pesto Basil Pesto
  • 1/2 cup vegan Mayonnaise
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 1/2 cups frozen peas cooked according to package instructions
  • 2 cups steamed asparagus chopped
  • 1 1/2 cups chickpeas drained
  • 3/4 cup pine nuts
  1. While pasta is cooking, stir together the pesto and mayo until smooth.
  2. Combine hot pasta, pesto, salt, peas, asparagus, chickpeas, and pine nuts in a large bowl and stir to toss.
  3. Sprinkle with chives and serve!