NEW SEASON ASPARAGUS AND PEAS RISOTTO

aspargusServes 4-6

  • 6 cups vegetable stock, preferably homemade
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 1 cup Arborio rice
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1 bunch asparagus, trimmed, stalks cut into 2-inch lengths
  • 1 cup fresh/thawed frozen peas
  • 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest, plus more for garnish
  • 2TBS fresh lemon juice
  • 1 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • 1/2 cup finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano, plus more for serving
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
  1. Bring stock to a simmer in a medium saucepan.
  2. Heat 2 tablespoons oil over medium heat in another saucepan. Cook onion, stirring frequently, until soft, 6 to 7 minutes. Add rice, cook, stirring, until edges are translucent, 2 to 3 minutes. Add wine; cook, stirring, just until evaporated.
  3. Add 1/2 cup hot stock; cook, stirring, until almost absorbed. Continue adding 1/2 cup stock in this manner until liquid is creamy and rice is al dente, about 20 minutes total (you may not need to add all the stock). Add asparagus with the last addition of stock, and the peas about 5 minute before risotto is done if using fresh or 1 min for frozen.
  4. Remove from heat; stir in lemon zest and juice, parsley, cheese, and remaining 2 tablespoons oil. Season with salt and pepper. Serve immediately with additional cheese and lemon zest.

SPICY ROASTED BRUSSELS SPROUTS

I LOVE BRUSSELS SPROUTS ….DR. C

brussels sproutsToss together cleaned and sliced in half Brussels Sprouts (about 1 ½ lbs) with 2 Tbs  Extra Virgin Olive Oil, 1/4c white wine vinegar,1/4c honey and 4 Tbs Sriracha sauce (more if you like spicy).

Season with salt and pepper.

Preheat oven to 400F.

Spread on a tray…… cut sides down and pour any leftover sauce over the top.

Roast till golden about 20 -30 minutes

Thanks to Sonia M for this recipe.

Relief through Chiropractic: Case Studies

Researching Chiropractic

Chiropractic clinical case histories have been a regular feature of our patient newsletter since its inception. There seems to be no limit to the health problems that respond to chiropractic care. How many people suffering, on drugs, facing a life of limitation could be helped by chiropractic care? Probably most of them.

Erb’s Palsy and chiropractic

Erb’s Palsy is a paralysis of the arm caused by nerve damage (to the brachial plexus) in the neck. It is most often caused by obstetrical mistakes. These injured children grow into adults with permanent nerve and arm damage – a shorter and smaller arm – unless corrected. This is the story of one lucky baby.

In this case a 5-month-old girl diagnosed with right-sided Erb’s Palsy was brought in for care to a chiropractic office. Under chiropractic care the infant’s symptoms resolved within two months. (8)

Reference: Resolution of Erb-Duchenne Palsy in a 5-month-old female following subluxation based chiropractic care. Journal of Pediatric, Maternal & Family Health – Chiropractic. 2016;1:9-13. 

Headache and neck pain in an eight-year-old girl

An 8-year-old girl was brought in for chiropractic care suffering from neck pain and headaches. According to the patient’s mother, her daughter reported her headaches and neck pain had been going on for four months with approximately two episodes per week.

Medical examinations did not find any problem and the doctors recommended treating the neck and headache symptoms with Tylenol. Following four chiropractic visits, the child’s neck pain and headaches completely resolved.

Reference: Simmons-Stone D, Alcantara J. Resolution of chronic cervicogenic headache & cervicalgia in a child following chiropractic care. Journal of Pediatric, Maternal & Family Health – Chiropractic. 2016;1:1-4. 

Neurofibromatosis

A 3-year-old boy with a history of Neurofibromatosis Type I, asthma and ear infections was brought in for chiropractic care. His asthma attacks were so severe he required ER hospital visits two times per month.

He received chiropractic adjustments two to three times per week. Within one month after beginning care he no longer had violent exacerbations of his asthma and was able to sleep through the night. As of this writing he continues to improve and has decreased his inhaler usage. (10)

Reference: Kachinsky B, Kachinsky J. Improvement in a pediatric patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 and asthma: a case report. Journal of Pediatric, Maternal & Family Health – Chiropractic. 2011;1:1-4.

Traditional Eating: Spring Butter

Spring is coming and soon it’ll be the time to get one of the healthiest foods on the planet: spring butter. In some cultures, it is considered sacred.

 spring butterWhat is spring butter?

Spring butter is different from regular butter because the cows in the spring cow eat new growing grass filled with healthy growth enzymes full of lots of minerals and vitamins. The butter looks different – golden yellow as opposed to pale yellow or the straw colored you see in the supermarket. It also tastes much better.

 Where can you get it?

Ideally you get it from a local farm where the cows spend their days in the fields eating the various plants that they are attracted to. The cows’ milk is rich in butterfat and the butter is a nutrient dense “superfood.”

Don’t live near a farm? It would be worth traveling to one; the butter can stay in your freezer all year.

 

Pregnancy and Chiropractic

pregnant womanIf there’s any class of patients that need chiropractic care the most it’s pregnant women.

Pregnancy changes a woman’s life in many ways. One way is a special chemical called “relaxin.”

Relaxin is a hormone produced by the ovaries and the placenta that effects the female reproductive system especially during pregnancy. In preparation for childbirth, it relaxes the muscles, joints and ligaments in the pelvis, softens and widens the cervix and relaxes the smooth muscle in the uterus. It does even more by increasing heart and kidney blood output.

In males relaxin enhances the motility of sperm in semen.

Sometimes there’s a down side to relaxin. If the spine and pelvis are unbalanced, or subluxated, then the relaxin can make the subluxations and distortions worse! The result is spine and pelvic pain which is too common in pregnancy. Additionally, the unbalanced body needs more energy for walking, standing, sitting and moving causing fatigue and exhaustion.

Chiropractic can help

Chiropractic can help ensure that the pregnant body is balanced and that the pelvis is relaxed and open to its maximum so the developing baby has the ideal amount of room in which to develop. That is why clinical reports reveal that breech presentations have been corrected, with the fetus turning into a healthy position, as a result of chiropractic adjusting procedures. Clinical reports show chiropractic also helps with breastfeeding and the return to a pre-pregnancy figure. (1-7)

References

  1. Thomas JC. The Webster Technique in a 28-year-old woman with breech presentation and subluxation [case report]. JVSR. April 7 2008:1-3.
  2. Brynhildsen J, Hansson A, Persson A, Hammar M. Follow-up of patients with low back pain during pregnancy. Obstetrics & Gynecology. 1998;91(2):182-186.
  3. Phillips C. An effective drug-free approach to premature contractions. ICA Review. 1998;54(5):76-81.
  4. Phillips C. Back labor: a possible solution for a painful situation. ICA Review. 1997;53(4):51-56.
  5. Cohen E. Case history: premature labor. Chiropractic Pediatrics. 1995;1(4).
  6. Reynolds JP. What is the role of osteopathic manipulative therapy in obstetric care? JAOA. 1974;74.
  7. Guthrie RA, Martin RH. Effect of pressure applied to the upper thoracic (placebo) versus lumbar areas (osteopathic manipulative treatment) for inhibition of lumbar myalgia during labor. JAOA. 1982;82(4):247-251.

Questions and Answers about Chiropractic

Chiropractor treating a patient

Q: Where did chiropractic come from?

A: Chiropractic was rediscovered and named in 1895 in Davenport, Iowa by DD Palmer, a magnetic healer and teacher who performed the first chiropractic adjustment on his deaf janitor. When the man’s hearing returned Palmer began to investigate the relationship between health and the spinal column.

Q: Why “rediscovered?”

A: Spinal healing had been practiced for thousands of years in nearly every civilization on earth. It has stood the test of time, having been a blessing to millions of people for millennia. But its ancient techniques and principles became lost as humanity became enthralled with drugs and surgery. Dr. Palmer revived and began to teach this old/new healing art.

Q: Was chiropractic accepted at first?

A: People flocked to the first chiropractors. Here was a non-drug, non-surgical approach to healthcare that was safe and effective. The number of Doctors of Chiropractic grew from one man in the American Midwest to thousands in a short time. Chiropractic especially grew in popularity during the 1919 flu pandemic when people under chiropractic care had almost no mortality while people under medical care suffered many deaths.

Q: Did the medical profession accept chiropractors?

A: The medical profession saw chiropractic’s drug-free approach as a threat to their monopoly in healthcare and attacked chiropractors claiming they were practicing “medicine and surgery without a license.” Many chiropractors were actually jailed, fined or imprisoned – but they refused to surrender. Eventually the laws were changed to permit more freedom for non-medical healthcare professionals.

Q: So there is peace now between the healing arts?

A: Not exactly. As more and more people turn to non-medical practitioners the medical profession is finally accepting competition. The medical monopoly is slowly but steadily breaking.

There are different philosophies of health and healing; chiropractic/natural healing approaches and medicine are on opposite sides of the spectrum and disagree strongly on many healthcare issues. The result is that people have access to more information from other perspectives, are often better informed and can make better decisions.

Latest News From Charmaine: April 2016

Greetings All

Trying not to hold my breath…but dang it looks like Spring has FINALLY arrived!

daffodilsSpring Has Arrived

If you look around you will notice the first harbingers of spring…crocus, daffodils, forsythia and a very light green to many of the trees as they slowly start budding.  Hopefully the most recent freezing weather does not affect the fruit crops of the state or the trees that blossom early, like magnolias, etc.

With all the gentle Spring days here, there are lots of wonderful days to get out and walk, or maybe even bike before we can really get into the garden to plant anything new…also time to finish that fall cleanup that didn’t happen!

Think thru a task before jumping in

While I am not a fan of timidity or overly cautious attitudes…please think thru a task before jumping in and possibly ruining your back/ day/weekend.  Happily, we are available to get you out of that pickle, although our first choice would be prevention- not “fixing”.

Quick Spring Trip

The last few days of April, 4/28 thru’ 30th we will be heading down to S.C.  for our college “Homecoming” or Lyceum as it’s called.   So, we will be open in the am on that Thursday 4/28 as a schedule change…signs will be up in the office as a reminder.

Sophia heading off soon

Meanwhile, Sophia is on countdown to graduation and will continue to work with us for a few more weeks before heading off to Northwestern.

Congratulations to Allen

Congratulations to Allen H who has received an Artistic Scholarship to NMU……we have talented people in our midst.

Share your story with us!

OH YES this comes to mind…we have several patients who are state or national or even world champions in a variety of activities/sports….or have received special recognition (like Hall of Fame recognition)….we would love you to share your story with us and the greater Chiropractic Community if you are willing…..talk to me or Dr. Ray.

See you in the office, on the table, on the mat or under the barbells!!

Zika–Head for Hills!

Zika, SARS, Swine flu (twice), AIDS, bird flu, H1N1 – it’s coming.

By Dr. Tedd Koren

Head for the hills, don’t travel, don’t go out, stay home, hide under the bed, wear a condom: the next invisible killer is coming.   Oh boy, here we go again.

Every year or so the media goes ballistic and reveals that epidemiologists, researchers, and health departments are sloppy, shoot-from-the-hip, do poor research, haven’t a clue and will do and say nearly anything to get attention. Actually that’s what the media should be telling us. Instead they are part of the problem because they repeat the junk science they are told as if it’s the gospel truth. What happened to investigative journalism?

George Carlin famously said, “Americans panic easily.” Panic sells. Panic sells magazines and newspapers, and drives people to web sites, drugs and vaccines. Panic raises ratings so people will “stay tuned” and therefore advertising revenues rise.

People are excited, scared, terrified, curious, wondering, hopeful and nervous. Aren’t the presidential elections enough? I guess not.

Ho hum      

As with all the other media driven “pandemics”, when the dust settled it was no big deal. The Zika virus scare is no different; it’s a zilch (which is what my spell checker spelled out when I first typed the word Zika.)
In Brazil 4,000 cases of microcephaly were reported due to the Zika virus.

Ooops, we didn’t report it correctly. The number is 207.

Ooops, we found Zika in only 17 of them. Some pandemic.

But now reports are that heavy use of pesticides are related to the microcephaly. The DPT vaccine causes microcephaly – why didn’t the media report that?

Zika is one of millions or billions of viruses found all over the world. We’re full of viruses – and that doesn’t mean they cause anything. The media continues to spin out stories because that’s what the media does.

Going Meatless?

Part 5 of our New Year New You series

We talked in December about cutting down on meat consumption….why??????

Because going meatless once a week may reduce your risk of chronic preventable conditions like:

  • cancer
  • cardiovascular
  • disease
  • diabetes
  • obesity

And going meatless once a week can also help reduce our carbon footprint and save precious resources like fossil fuels and fresh water.

Jamie Oliver quote

Recipe for Stacked Vegetable Enchiladas

FOR YOUR HEALTH

Reduce Heart Disease and Stroke

Vegetables, fruit, and whole grains have been shown to protect against cardiovascular disease. One study found that each daily serving of fruits or vegetables was associated with a 4% decline in coronary heart disease, and a 5% lower risk of stroke. Another study found that a diet of 2.5 or more servings of whole grain per day was associated with a 21% lower risk of cardiovascular disease (heart disease, stroke, fatal cardiovascular disease)

Limit Cancer Risk

There is convincing evidence that red meat and processed meat consumption increases the risk of colorectal cancer. There is also limited but suggestive evidence that red meat increases the risk of esophagus, lung, pancreas, and endometrium cancer and that processed meat consumption increases the risk of esophagus, lung, stomach, and prostate cancer.

In contrast, a diet rich in fruit and vegetables decreases the risk of several types of cancers, including mouth, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, and stomach, evidence suggests.

Fight Diabetes

Research suggests that plant-based diets, particularly those low in processed meat, can reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. Eating a plant-based diet can decrease total calorie consumption which helps you obtain and maintain a healthy weight, a key component to preventing and treating diabetes.

curb obesityCurb Obesity

Several large studies in Europe and the United States have demonstrated that people on plant-based, vegetarian diets tend to have a significantly lower body weight and body mass index (BMI). This may be in part because plant-based diets are rich in fiber (which is not found in animal products). Fiber contributes to fullness, resulting in lower calorie intake and less overeating.

Recipe for 30-Minute Quinoa Enchilada Skillet

Live Longer

Evidence suggests that eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, and a limited amount of red meat can increase longevity, whereas red and processed meat consumption is associated with increases in deaths due to cancer and cardiovascular disease.

Improve The Nutritional Quality of Your Diet

Going meatless encourages consumption of plant-based sources of protein, like beans and peas. Consuming beans and peas results in a higher intake of fiber, protein, folate, zinc, iron, and magnesium. Also, diets high in beans and peas are associated with lower intakes of saturated fat and total fat.

FOR YOUR WALLETwallet

Curb Healthcare Spending

Each year in the United States, chronic diseases like heart disease, stroke, cancer, and diabetes cause 7 in 10 deaths, and account for 75% of the $2 trillion spent on medical care. In 2008, the estimated health care costs related to obesity were $147 billion. By reducing our risk for these conditions, we can curtail healthcare spending nationwide.

Cut Weekly Budget

Many people save money by adding meatless meals to their weekly menus. Meatless meals are built around vegetables, beans and grains—instead of meat, which tends to be more expensive. This is partly because producing meat requires extra expenses like feed and transportation. Though it can be challenging to serve healthy meals on a budget, going meatless once a week can help conserve money for more fruits and vegetables.

nature trailFOR THE ENVIRONMENT

Minimize Water Usage

The water needs of livestock are much greater than those of vegetables and grains.

– Approximately 1,850 gallons of water are needed to produce a single pound of beef.
– Approximately 39 gallons of water are needed to produce a pound of vegetables.

Americans consume nearly four times the amount of animal protein than the global average. When compared with current food intake in the US, a vegetarian diet could reduce water consumption by up to 58% per person.

Reduce Greenhouse Gases

Studies show that meat production produces significantly more greenhouse gases than vegetables, including carbon dioxide, Methane and Nitrous Oxide – the three main contributing sources of greenhouse gas. Beef was found to produce a total of 30 kg of greenhouse gas (GHG) per kg of food, while carrots, potatoes and rice produce .42, .45 and 1.3 kg GHG per kg of food, respectively.

Reduce Fuel Dependence

About 25 kilocalories of fossil fuel energy is used to produce 1 kilocalorie of all meat based protein, as compared with 2.2 kilocalories of fossil fuel input per 1 kilocalorie of grain based protein produced. The meat industry uses so much energy to produce grain for livestock that if instead we used the grain to feed people following a vegetarian diet, it would be enough to feed about 840 million people.

We want to hear from you

What motivates you to cut back on your meat consumption? We want to know.

Stacked Roasted Vegetable Enchiladas

Ingredients

1 large red pepper, chopped, seeds removed
1 medium zucchini, chopped
1 medium yellow squash, chopped
1 large onion, chopped
1 tablespoon olive oil
Salt and pepper
1 can black beans, rinsed and drained
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon chili powder
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 jalapeño, minced
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
Salt and pepper, to taste
2 cups red enchilada sauce
9-10 small corn tortillas
2 cups shredded Monterey Jack cheese

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Place red pepper, zucchini, yellow squash, and onion on a large baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and toss until vegetables are coated. Season with salt and pepper. Roast vegetables for 30-40 minutes, or until tender, stirring occasionally. Remove vegetables from oven and let cool to room temperature. Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees F.
  2. Grease an 8×8 square baking pan and set aside. In a medium bowl, combine roasted vegetables, black beans, cumin, chili powder, garlic, jalapeño, and cilantro. Stir and season with salt and pepper.
  3. Spread 1/4 cup of enchilada sauce into the bottom of the baking pan. Add a layer of tortillas, to completely cover the bottom of the pan. You might have to cut the tortillas to make them fit. Top with 1/3 of the vegetable/bean mixture and 1/3 of the cheese. Make a second layer of tortilla, enchilada sauce, vegetables/beans, and cheese. Top with a layer of tortillas, enchilada sauce, vegetables/beans, and cheese. Spray a sheet of aluminum foil with cooking spray and cover the pan.
  4. Bake enchiladas for 20 minutes. Remove the foil and bake for another 10 minutes, or until cheese is melted and the enchiladas are bubbling. Remove enchiladas from the oven and let cool for 10 minutes. Cut into squares and serve warm.