Archive by Author

Researching Chiropractic: Heart rate variability

Heart rate variabilityWhat is heart rate variability?

The timing between heart beats should vary beat-to-beat. That is called heart rate variability (HRV). The more HRV, the greater a person’s health. Low HRV has been linked to physical and emotional dis-ease or body malfunction.

Heart rate variability has been used to evaluate the nervous system

Analysis of the beat-to-beat intervals (heart rate variability) has been used to evaluate the nervous system balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions. Analysis of beat-to- beat variability is a simple, non-invasive technique to evaluate autonomic dysfunction and may be a tool to assess the changes in autonomic activity associated with the reduction and correction of vertebral subluxations. A search of the relevant literature found that some controlled studies suggest that very thing: chiropractic care may improve heart rate variability in a positive way – meaning that nervous system function improves.

The author writes, “Vertebral subluxations may result in altered autonomic nervous system activity. Heart rate variability is a reliable and valid tool that may be used to assess the changes in autonomic activity associated with the reduction and correction of vertebral subluxations.” (1)


  1. Kent C. Heart rate variability to assess the changes in autonomic nervous system function associated with vertebral subluxation. Annals of Vertebral Subluxation Research. October 16, 2017:201-208.

Researching Chiropractic: Placental insufficiency

Placental insufficiency and fetal growth restrictionPlacental insufficiency

There seems to be no limit to the health problems that respond to chiropractic care. How many people suffering, on drugs, facing a life of limitation could be helped by chiropractic care?

Probably most of them.

A 29-year-old female, who was 32 weeks pregnant, presented for chiropractic care because she was concerned about a diagnosis of placental insufficiency and delayed fetal growth that was given after an ultrasound examination. There is no medical treatment for this condition.

However, chiropractic analysis revealed subluxations in her cervical spine (neck), sacrum and pelvis. She had eight visits over a three-week period to correct her subluxations. On the day after her first visit she had another ultrasound that revealed normal placental blood flow and normal fetal growth rate. She was able to carry the baby to 37 weeks permitting the fetus 3 to 4 more weeks of growth. (1)


  1. Rashid M, Heyns SB, Findlay M et al. Reduction in placental insufficiency and normalized fetal growth rate in a pregnant patient following chiropractic care for vertebral subluxation: a case report. Journal of Pediatric, Maternal & Family Health – Chiropractic. 2017;4:178-184.

Maple Roasted Brussels Sprouts

For the Brussels Sprouts haters!!!Maple Roasted Brussel Sprouts

  • 1 pound Brussels sprouts, ends trimmed and outer leaves removed and halved
  • 1 medium sweet onion, slices
  • 1 large apple, peeled, cored and cubed
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Toss the Brussels sprouts, onions and apples together in a bowl.
  3. Mix the olive oil, maple syrup, salt and pepper together then drizzle over Brussels sprouts mixture. Stir until everything is coated (add another tablespoon of maple syrup if you so desire) and place on a greased baking sheet.
  4. Bake for 25-30 minutes, stirring a few times while baking, until apples are tender, onions soft and Brussels sprouts begin to caramelize.  ENJOY!

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING DIFFERENT FOR DINNER SIDES?

Cheesy Hasselback Potatoes -6 servingsDINNER SIDES

  •  4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced or finely diced
  • 6 med Yukon potatoes, scrubbed & dried
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup shredded Parmesan

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F and line a baking sheet with foil.

In a small saucepot, bring the butter, oil and garlic to a boil over high heat; remove from the heat.

Using 2 wooden spoons placed on each side of a potato as a guide, cut the potato into thin slices about 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick, without cutting through the bottom (the spoons will keep you from cutting all the way through the potato). Repeat with the remaining potatoes. Place the potatoes on the prepared baking sheet and brush each potato with some of the butter mixture, trying to get the butter between the slices. Sprinkle each potato with salt and pepper.

Bake for 30 minutes, then remove the potatoes from the oven. The potatoes will have started to spread out from cooking and it will be easier to brush each slice with some more of the butter mixture. Put the potatoes back in the oven for an additional 20 minutes.

Remove the potatoes from the oven again and sprinkle the Parmesan over the top and into the slices. Return to the oven to melt and brown the cheese, an additional 5 minutes. Serve the potatoes immediately.

Researching Chiropractic: Hypothyroidism

There seems to be no limit to the health problems that respond to chiropractic care. How many people suffering, on drugs, facing a life of limitation could be helped by chiropractic care?

Probably most of them.

Hypothyroidism and irritable bowel, lower backhypothyroidism

A 34-year-old woman visited a chiropractic office complaining of low back, hip and upper back pain. She also reported that she was medically diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome and secondary hypothyroidism.

Chiropractic analysis revealed subluxations that were causing nervous system imbalance (dysautonomia). Chiropractic adjustments corrected her subluxations. After two months of care, the patient’s thyroid function test showed improvement and she was able to stop her medication. Additionally, she reported improvement in her irritable bowel syndrome, low back, hip and upper back pain. (1)


  1. Campbell AM, Delander K. Resolution of hypothyroidism & irritable bowel syndrome in a 34-year-old female following chiropractic care to reduce vertebral subluxation: a case study & review of the literature. Annals of Vertebral Subluxation Research. October 26, 2017:209-220.

Traditional Eating – What We Stopped Doing

Do you know what traditional eating is? traditional eating

Our ancestors did it for hundreds and thousands of generations. It’s prized in all cultures. What is traditional eating?

Eating fats. 

Here’s an example of traditional eating:

When Eskimos (Inuit) catch game such as seal, caribou, bear, etc. they prize the liver and internal organs and give the lean muscle meat to their dogs.

This diet is found all over the world. Even today many cultures still prize the health qualities of organ meats:

  • chopped liver
  • sweetbreads (thymus or pancreas)
  • Scottish haggis (heart, liver, lung pudding)
  • sausage from many cultures
  • British bangers
  • Irish shepherds’ pie

There are many similar dishes all over the world.

It seems to be the opposite with modern society. And yet lean meats were always considered less important and less nutritious than the fatty organ meats. It’s true, organ meats have far more nutrients. Serve some this holiday season!

CDC Admits There is No Science Behind the Flu Vaccine

Skip the Flu Vaccine This Yearflu vaccine

How do you feel about the flu vaccine?

Through all of her years of medical training Cammy Benton, MD said the only thing she was taught with regard to vaccines were that they were “safe and effective” and to discard the vaccine inserts, as they were all “lawyer jargon.”

But she began to ask questions about the science behind the flu shot, and even asked a senior CDC official about it at an event. She found no credible studies backing up the science behind the flu shot.

When she called the CDC about it, the CDC admitted there was no science confirming the effectiveness of the flu vaccine, it was simply “all we have” to combat the flu season.

Dr. Benton then asked why hospitals were not requiring ALL medical personnel to wear face masks during the flu season, since the CDC was admitting the flu vaccine was not effective.

The person at the CDC hung up and the next Monday Dr. Benton was presented with a four-month severance pay. She states that this was the best “vacation” she could have received at that time, because she spent every day studying about vaccines.

Watch the video interview and read the rest here!

Did this article change your mind? We want to hear your opinions on the subject!

What causes back pain (subluxations)?

Questions and Answers About ChiropracticWhat causes back pain?

Question:  What causes back pain?

Answer: Back pain is usually caused by subluxations in the spine.

Have you ever developed back pain and had no idea what you did?

The following things can contribute:

  • A difficult birth or delivery
  • An auto accident
  • A fall no matter how long ago (even as a toddler)
  • Bad posture
  • Eating junk food (chemical stress)
  • Using the same body position over and over at work or play (repetitive strain injury)
  • Emotional tension
  • Pushing yourself too hard
  • Being a couch potato
  • Dental work
  • Drug use, medications
  • Working in an awkward position
  • A mild jar when you’re unprepared
  • An emotional shock when your energy is low
  • Long car rides

If y0u are experiencing back pain or have any other of the above listed things occur please call us today. We can help!

Your Inner Healer – Let It Out

I desired to know why one person was ailing and his associate, eating at the same table, working in the same shop…was not. Why? What difference was there in the two persons that caused one to have [disease] while his partner…escaped? Why? (1) D.D. Palmer, Founder of Chiropractic

Are you healthy if you feel good? If you said, “Yes,” ask yourself if you ever felt good one day and then came down with a cold, the flu or some other condition the next.

Are you in tune with your inner healer? inner healer

There is a part of your body that is especially intimate with your inner wisdom: your nervous system, composed of your brain, spinal cord and the billions of nerves that emerge from them. Your nervous system touches every nook and cranny of your body, and your innate intelligence uses this vast communications system to organize your billions of parts into a healthy, adapting, living being. (2) True health or adaptation can only emerge when your innate intelligence can communicate to your body parts without interference or “static.”

A complete loss of communication happens in death; a partial loss results in a general deterioration of health – or “dis-ease” – you are less alive and less able to cope with life’s stresses. Eventually a dis-eased state turns into disease conditions. (3)

Subluxations are a common, often painless condition that stresses your spine and nervous system and causes “static,” dis-ease or body malfunction. Doctors of Chiropractic spend years of training learning how to locate and correct your subluxations, freeing your body from dis-ease and helping you better reconnect to your inner healer.

Make sure you are free of subluxations – visit your chiropractor today!


  1.   Palmer DD. The science, art and philosophy of chiropractic. Portland, OR: Portland Printing House. 1910.
  2. Ornstein R, Sobel D. The brain as a health maintenance organization In R. Ornstein & S. Swencionis (Eds.), The Healing Brain, A Scientific Reader. New York: Guilford Press. 1990;11.
  3. Selye H. The Stress of Life (Rev. ed.). New York: McGraw Hill. 1976.

Quinoa-Cranberry Stuffed Acorn Squash

SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 medium acorn squash (2 to 2 1/4 pounds each)
  • 3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1 cup red quinoa, rinsed well
  • 1 teaspoon mild curry powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 cup dried cranberries
  • 1 cup loosely packed fresh parsley leaves, chopped
  • 1/4 cup roasted, salted and shelled pistachios, coarsely chopped

INSTRUCTIONS

Position an oven rack in the middle of the oven; preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Cut each squash in half lengthwise and scoop out and discard the seeds. Arrange the halves in a large baking dish, flesh-side up.

Whisk together the vinegar, 2 tablespoons of the oil and the maple syrup in a cup. Brush the flesh side of the squash halves with some of the maple mixture and sprinkle with 1/4 teaspoon salt and a few grinds of pepper. Put the squash flesh-side down in the baking dish, then brush the skin side with maple mixture and sprinkle with 1/4 teaspoon salt and a few grinds of pepper. Roast until the squash is fork-tender, 50 to 60 minutes. Poke the inside of the squash halves with a fork and brush generously with more of the maple mixture.

Meanwhile, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until soft and golden brown, about 6 minutes. Add the quinoa, curry powder, cinnamon, and 1 teaspoon salt and stir until the spices are toasted, about 1 minute. Add 2 cups water and bring to a simmer. Lower the heat, cover the pan and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the quinoa is tender and most of the liquid is absorbed, 15 to 18 minutes. Remove from the heat and let sit, covered, for 5 minutes. Uncover and stir in the cranberries, remaining maple mixture, half of the parsley and half of the pistachios.

Stuff the squash halves with the quinoa and sprinkle with the remaining parsley and pistachios. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Cook’s Note

The squash may be baked and stuffed the day before and refrigerated. To reheat, cover the baking dish loosely with foil and reheat in a 350-degree F oven, checking the squash every 5 minutes until it is hot.